Rescued by Art~

On yet another gloomy winter day in Duesseldorf

museums and art galleries can save your soul
This image was created by using in camera multiple exposure of a photograph I took of a fellow photographer and an exhibited gallery photograph, I love what the camera did with the head and eye …
another in camera double exposure
who said a visit to the bathroom has to be boring!

All images taken during a meetup of photographers I organized last Saturday in Kunst im Tunnel museum in Düsseldorf.

A self portrait I created using shutter priority setting at 1/8 of a second

The Unknown Beckons~

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Isn’t every moment a step further into the unknown? We think we know where we are going, we have it all planned out, then life reminds us of the futility of our false certainty. I welcome the unknown, I want to live in the joy of discovery, to be surprised by life, to meet the future with an open mind.

I took these images today at the amazing James Turrell exhibit in Shanghai.

Day 8~ March 8th~ Egypt

the burial mask of Tutankhamun~ Cairo museum

 

The journey to Egypt was more a journey of feelings, sensing and of connection than that of collecting brain information. There were places and things in Egypt that let me ‘feel’ so much more than others. One of these beacons was the tomb of Tutankhamun.

The son of Akhenaten, king at age 9, reformer of religion from god Aten to god Amun, youngest Pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty of ancient Egypt, the young boy king was to die at age 18. There has been so much written and said about this enigmatic king and so much of it fails to meet logic.

One thing that was for me undeniable standing in the tomb where Tutankhamun’s mummy was found, despite it being a much simpler tomb than that of other kings, a soft and gentle cloud wrapped itself around the place and a great quiet, a stillness that I feel even now as I write this. The mummy was housed in 7 levels of gold and wood and it was discovered in 1922 in the Valley of the Kings by Howard Carter.

the alabaster canopic jars of Tutankhamun

the burial mask of the boy king

 

Day 6~ March 6th~ Egypt

Nofet~noble woman and princess

There is something so entirely remarkable about the statues and the art you see from ancient Egypt. Putting aside any feelings of eeriness and discomfort, the art feels somehow, yes, alive. It radiates, it vibrates, it holds your gaze, it stirs deeply…

And after doing all of that, it makes you think, question, dwell and contemplate. Someone once put out the rather obvious but profound observation that can be easily missed: “Why are teeth never shown in ancien Egypt? What is that all about?”

The seated statues of Nofret (Nefret) and Ra-Hotep (noble prince and Pharaoh’s son and princess) from the 4th Dynasty of Egypt were photographed in the Cairo museum, they stand about 1.2 meters high and are remarkably well preserved. The light on Nefret’s face is from a passing by guide’s flashlight.

Nofret and Ra-Hotep~ Cairo Museum

Day 3~ March 3rd~ Egypt

Ka (ancient wooden statue with out-stretched set of arms above the head at the Cairo museum)

While searching and researching inside the realms of Ancient Egypt, the unseen comes into focus as the seen gradually gets blurred…

The ancient Egyptians believed that each person hosted in themselves a double, an electrical entity that ushered and guided them towards their true destiny. They called it the Ka. Their Ka was to live beyond the death of their physical bodies and mummifications served as preparations for homes that the Ka would one day return to inhabit.

Their lives were lived in great discipline as to remain pure and adhere to purpose because any deviation from purpose was an abomination of the Ka.

What was most haunting for me standing in front of this statue was the look in its eyes. It was the kind of look that can take you on a journey, far beyond where you would normally be.