Life course interrupted~ Syrian refugee

Syrian refugee in North Lebanon

Syrian refugee in North Lebanon

As the west prepares to launch a missile attack on Syria in the coming days, the innocent children find themselves caught in the games of warring adults having no say as to where their life will be taking them next. More than 4000 Syrians are seeking refuge daily in Lebanon, where they make a staggering 35% of the Lebanese population today. A ticking bomb in a fragile zone, heart breaking and unfair in so many ways. If the children are the hope for our future, why are we endangering that chance?

Day 29~ February 29th~ Lebanon

Farewell to the ancient mountains

I am 2 days late in posting this because I am finding it so hard to leave my one month process with Lebanon, the most special place for me on this Earth. But life and this project must go on. On to the next journey in the next place which you will know about in the next post. It has been quite a journey the last month mentally traveling through my archives of photos, through my diaries and through the hieroglyphs of my mind. I hope you were able to get a small sense of how wonderful and extraordinary Lebanon was, is and can be. Thank you to all the wonderful people who have been following, commenting and encouraging along the way. Great thanks to the people at wordpress who added this blog to freshly pressed twice! And many thanks to those who have been nominating me for awards. I must admit, I have not figured out how the whole process works and what to do with them, but I will.

I am posting 2 self portraits from Lebanon, one with my beloved mountains and one gazing at the deep blue Mediterranean.

See you tomorrow elsewhere 🙂

farewell to the deep blue sea

Day 16~ February 16th~ Lebanon

hospitality

It can safely be said that hospitality is an essence that lives and resonates strongly in Lebanese people and in their society. It is a place that a visitor is often invited to a meal several times a day by total strangers, and it is not a matter of speech, they really do mean it and they do receive great pleasure from feeding you. It is an open door policy, especially in villages and a warmth and generosity that is very difficult to say no to. In fact you must choose between getting fat during the holidays or upsetting quite a few people who cannot handle your rejection. In a world where anonymity is becoming the rule of day, returning to such openness and close contact with people is so heartwarming and refreshing.

Day 15~ February 15~ Lebanon

water

On a few occasions while living in New York and when answering ‘Lebanon’ to the ‘where do you come from?’ question, I was hit with the following questions: “do you have a camel?”, or “how does it feel to live in the desert?”, and my favorite: “wow, I did not know that you were African!”.

Now, I had learned to accept the fact that a few Americans did not find it necessary to get acquainted with the rest of the world, but I was always feeling very strongly about passing on the fact that Lebanon has the most moderately wonderful weather with dozens of sub-climates, more water than any other country in the Middle East, has 12 rivers, and thousands of clear cascading waterfalls from snow capped mountains. It has been named since biblical times the most fertile and lush country in the region.

And I must point out that I only saw my first camel when I travelled out of the desert free Lebanon 🙂