Day 24~ March 24th~ Egypt

bedouin children~ Egypt

Imagine having a makeshift hut or a tent for a home, knowing that your home is where your belongings are, it is not a place, it is a moving entity…

Growing up in Lebanon I have always been fascinated by the lives of Bedouins. I watched their children play on dusty roadsides, barefoot, in and around tents, knowing that as the weather got colder, they would pack up and move again. I knew them to have a great honor system and to be extremely hospitable.

We were lucky as children to have a bedouin nanny named “Mahasen” live with us to help take care of my 2 younger brothers. Mahasen used to have very long black hair, a gorgeous figure and she danced with a jug of water on her head in the most elegant way. She spoke a language unknown to us and her arabic was colored with a unique accent that my little brother eventually picked up. Mahasen enchanted us all with her charm, entered our hearts and became part of our home, until the horrible day came when her father took her away from our family by force. I remember driving in our parents car years later in Beirut, Lebanon’s capital and seeing her with her own child on her arms begging for change from the passing cars. We froze, she froze, she ran to our car kissing my little brother and tears were flowing out of everyone. That was the last time I saw Mahasen until I was in Egypt a few years later and I saw her in every Bedouin child’s face, in their deep eyes, in their rags, in their brown skin and in the warmth I felt radiating between us.

14 thoughts on “Day 24~ March 24th~ Egypt

  1. Mimo, an excellent and heart-swelling reflection on your Bedouin nanny __stirring, to say the least! Thanks Hon for the beautiful and moving personal flashback! 🙂

  2. uff. your posts seriously transport me to another world. That said, this post was particularly stirring. And a lovely photo to go with it.

  3. Hi,
    How wonderful it sounds to have such a person look after you, it must of been great to learn at such a young age about a different culture, and a different way of life, very special.
    I love your photo, it must be so hard for a lot of the children.

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