This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Welcome to My Home on the Web

Anhui Diaries~

Hongcun

Hongcun

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Long Chuan

Hongcun

Hongcun

Hongcun

Hongcun

From a recent journey to the old villages around Huangshan (yellow mountains) of China’s Anhui province, I was utterly inspired with the landscape, the feeling of calm that blankets the area and the mystical sense of being so far away from it all.

It made me think a lot about the nature of water, and reflections that are abundant in this place; the magic of seeing the world repeated, maybe for us to think twice.

A place I will happily return to.

Family Ties in the Culture of Yunnan’s Ethnic Minorities

family ties-3 ~ Yunnan family ties-4~ Yunnan family ties-5 ~ Yunnan (1 of 1) family ties-6 ~ Yunnan (1 of 1) family ties~ Yunnan family ties~ Yunnan-2 family ties~ YunnanIn my journeys into the remote villages of China’s Yunnan province, I was moved by the closeness of the older generation with the children of the tribe. Physical proximity seemed to be an easement factor relied upon in raising the children and arming them with needed confidence as they developed. Parents and grandparents went about their busy workdays with toddlers literally tied to their bodies in colorful embroidered sacks.

Something to consider in our modern world where gadgets are slowly taking the place of our warm human hugs.

Calling Home

The option to connect is there, at every moment

The option to connect is there, at every moment

For it to work, we must pick up the phone

For it to work, we must pick up the phone

We struggle all our lives to achieve higher understanding, to get closer to the truth, but most of the time we fail to make the first step.

Photos taken in Shanghai, at the Power Station of Art.

Yunnan’s Smoke Culture~ 3

Yunnan's smoke culture~_-5 Yunnan's smoke culture~_-6 Yunnan's smoke culture~_

The province of Yunnan, stretching over 394,000 square kilometers in the far southwest of the Republic of China, is rich in color, tradition and history. More than 30% of its population of 45 million is made up of over 25 ethnic minorities like the Yi, Bai, Hani, Zhuang, Miao, Mozuo and Dai people. Most of the ethnic minorities live in compact communities with rich customs and traditions that live on despite the recent economic change that takes over the Chinese mainland.

Each time I visited the region for a new photographic adventure I was drawn to capturing the very dominant smoking traditions amongst the different minorities. From he pipes that are passed on through generations, hand crafted with care and art to the large bamboo pipes, to modern day cigarettes, for good or bad, smoking lives on in Yunnan as a tribal tradition.

This post was also shared at the Huffington Post, where I blog regularly. 

Also I am very excited to announce a series of documentary workshops that I am conducting in Yunnan over the Spring and early fall of 2015. Read about it here!

Yunnan’s Smoke Culture~

Yunnan's smoke culture

man with pipe

Going back through images from a past trip to Yunnan’s Honghe area. I am planning a return visit to the region very soon. This is the first of a series on images of smoking inside the traditional life of the ethnic minorities residing in Yunnan.

Impressions From a Journey Between the Folds of Time

Sometimes life invites us into a brief interlude between the folds of time. There we see beyond the obvious, we feel more deeply and we re-evaluate our lives and where our importances lie. The past month has been just such a life changing happening and as I emerge trying to find the end of a thread I let go of, I find that a whole new selection of threads present themselves to me. I pray that I may choose wisely where to get back on the train we call destiny.

Photographs taken during the past month in Germany, Lebanon and China

More images on my instagram feed

The Complex Web of Greed~ Lebanon

Lady on her balcony in the area of Borj Hammoud, Beirut

Lady on her balcony in the area of Borj Hammoud, Beirut

I left my native Lebanon to New York City back in 1987. The war was still raging and the political and economic situations were highly unstable if not volatile. Today, almost 27 years later, the Lebanese struggle with rationed electricity, unstable economic and political situations, living on the brink of another war, receiving a flood of refugees from another neighbor and the only difference from then to now is how much thicker the pockets of our political leaders are getting. Corruption is their religion and money their God. How will the web of greed be ever dismantled?